The Hockey Show from this month

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Today vs New Arizona



 Cheap Shot Artist Matt Cooke Just Doesn't Get It

 Serial cheap shot artist Matt Cooke laid him lumber on Nashville's Shea Weber in Saturday's Wild-Predators game.  Weber then tried to fight Cooke, who did what he does best...he turtled like a pathetic loser.










UPDATE: CHEAP-SHOT ARTIST COOKE COULD BE DONE FOR SEASON:

Wild left wing Matt Cooke, who played two third-period shifts totaling 33 seconds Sunday in Vancouver, won’t play tonight against the Chicago Blackhawks and potentially a “longer period of time,” coach Mike Yeo said. The veteran villain will likely need season-ending surgery. 

Certainly a blow to the NHL losing such a talented player like Cooke, who most likely has thousands of fans nightly buying tickets to see his talented skills.

   ​​​BRUINS BLOW 2-0 BUT COME FROM BEHIND AND BEAT DEVILS IN OT, 3-2 








​NEWARK, N.J. - Ryan Spooner scored his first NHL goal with 2:14 left in overtime and the  Bruins defeated the New Jersey Devils 3-2 on Friday night after blowing a two-goal third-period lead.

Daniel Paille and David Pastrnak scored for Boston, which won for only the second time in nine games (2-5-2). Niklas Svedberg had 29 saves starting for the ailing Tuukka Rask, who had played in the last 18 games for Boston.

Travis Zajac and Jordin Tootoo tallied for New Jersey. Cory Schneider made 31 saves as the Devils lost their second straight and fell nine points behind Boston in the race for the last wild-card spot in the Eastern Conference.

The Bruins, who swept the three-game season series, are four points ahead of Florida for the final wild-card position.



TYLER SEGUIN TAKES CHEAP SHOT FROM VISOR-WEARING RUSSIAN, OUT 4-6 WEEKS







DMITRI KULIKOV GETS A FOUR GAME SUSPENSION. SEGUIN COULD MISS UP TO 21 GAMES.

GREAT LOGIC.

HOPE FOR HORTY IN OHIO?










 As reported by Aaron Portzline, The Columbus Dispatch  • 

​ TAMPA, Fla. — It’s way too early to say if Nathan Horton is on the road to a full recovery from his    debilitating back condition, the Blue Jackets cautioned.

 But Horton’s presence at the morning skate on Thursday and his general outlook and attitude when he  lunched with members of the front office this week have raised optimism that his career might not be finished.

 Horton did not speak to the media on Thursday, and his agent, Paul Krepelka, said all comments on his situation would come through the Blue Jackets. President of hockey operations John Davidson said Horton had a “little light in his eye” when they had lunch with general manager Jarmo Kekalainen.

 “There’s been some progress there. He is feeling a little better,” Davidson said. “I don’t know what that means in the big picture, but he’s better now than he was earlier this season. His whole attitude was different — better — than the last time we saw him.”

 Coach Todd Richards chatted only briefly with Horton on Thursday, he said.

 “In my heart, I’ve always believed he’s going to play again,” Richards said. “I still feel that way.”

 In November, Horton described his torturous existence because of a degenerative back injury and how it would take the surgical fusing of at least three vertebrae to relieve the pain. A surgery of that magnitude would limit his mobility and end his NHL career.

 The Blue Jackets and Horton agreed to wait and see what rest and time might accomplish.

 “It seems like things have been healing since he’s taken some time off,” Kekalainen said. “I’m the eternal optimist. Our focus the whole time has been to give it proper time to heal and, when the pain subsides, get into some workouts. I’ve been hopeful all the time, and I still am.”

 Horton and his family moved to Florida in the fall, in part, Davidson said, to get away from Columbus and the constant reminders of the Blue Jackets’ games he’s missing. He’s doing light exercises, Kekalainen said, and plans to return to Columbus this spring.