LIKE FATHER, LIKE SON

Max Domi makes quick work of Ryan Kesler


Bruce Cassidy Named 28th Head Coach Of The Boston Bruins

BOSTON - Boston Bruins General Manager Don Sweeney announced today, April 26, that Bruce Cassidy has been named the 28th head coach of the Boston Bruins.

Cassidy served as Interim Head Coach for the Bruins' final 33 regular and postseason games, compiling a 18-8-1 regular season record and propelling the team to a berth in the Stanley Cup Playoffs for the first time since the 2013-14 season. Since Cassidy assumed head coaching responsibilities on February 9, the Bruins ranked first in the NHL in goals per game (3.37), first in the NHL in fewest shots allowed (741), tied for second in the NHL in wins (18), tied for second in the NHL in power play percentage (27.8%), tied for third in the NHL in goals allowed per game (2.30), tied for fifth in the NHL in faceoff percentage (53.6%) and tied for sixth in the NHL in takeaways (229).

Before joining Boston as an assistant prior to the start of the 2016-17 season, Cassidy spent five seasons (2011-16) as head coach of the Providence Bruins, having spent the three previous seasons (2008-11) with the club as an assistant. The 51-year-old native of Ottawa, Ontario compiled a 207-128-45 overall record in 380 games at the helm, including winning seasons in all five years and postseason berths in each of his final four seasons in Providence. In 2015-16, Cassidy helped lead the P-Bruins to a 41-22-13 record.

Cassidy's previous NHL experience includes coaching the Washington Capitals from 2002-04, as he led the Caps to a 39-29-8-6 record and a postseason berth in his first season with the team. Following his exit from Washington, he served as an assistant coach with the Chicago Blackhawks for the 2005-06 season.

Cassidy also enjoyed a successful playing career, seeing action in the OHL, AHL, IHL and NHL, as well as overseas in Italy and Germany. The left-handed defenseman was originally drafted in the first round (18th overall) of the 1983 NHL Entry Draft by the Chicago Blackhawks. Over the course of five seasons (1985-90) at the NHL level, Cassidy recorded four goals and 13 assists for 17 points with 10 penalty minutes in 36 games played. 

It's the February episode of The Hockey Show. 
Paul Altmeyer and his aging sidekick Robert 'Horace' Greeley. Listen to Horace ramble on about how the Bruins line-up and watch his stringent preparation in action. 

They also spoke with Mark Divver of the Providence Journal at 28:22 and got his take on the Boston Bruins, Providence Bruins, and Providence College.

Go to 51:40 of the show to enjoy The Police Blotter segment. 

THE HOCKEY SHOW, FEBRUARY 2017

 
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BOSTON -- Bruins alternate captain Patrice Bergeron revealed Tuesday that he played the entire 2016-17 season with a sports hernia injury.

The top-line center met with the media after the players' exit meetings at Warrior Ice Arena and described the injury, which he said occurred either during his offseason training, or while playing for Team Canada at the World Cup of Hockey in September.

Bergeron said he's not sure whether or not he'll need surgery, but will rest his body first before making a decision on any procedure.

 "It's definitely something that was nagging," Bergeron told reporters. "It was there for most of the year, but having breaks in the second half definitely helped a lot to make it feel a little better."



Bergeron finished the season with 21 goals and 32 assists for 53 points, including a plus-12 rating in 79 games.

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LOGAN COUTURE TAKES BRENT BURNS     SLAPSHOT RIGHT IN THE KISSER, 
THEN NEEDS EXTENSIVE DENTAL WORK










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   JUMBO JOE PLAYED WITH A TORN ACL AND A                                  TORN MCL IN THE FIRST ROUND

​SAN JOSE, Calif. -- Before Joe Thornton heads into an uncertain offseason where he could be a free agent and leave San Jose after nearly 12 years, he had more pressing business.

Thornton underwent surgery on a torn ACL and MCL in his left knee Monday to repair an injury that sidelined him less than two weeks before he returned to play the final four games of a first-round series loss to the Edmonton Oilers.

"I've been in this business a long time," general manager Doug Wilson said. "You see a player play with that type of injury tells you all you need to know about him."

Thornton downplayed the injury before the team announced the severity of what he played through and the surgery, calling it simply "the normal stuff that hockey players deal with" at this time of the season.

But his willingness to play four playoff games on basically one leg at age 37, and record two assists, was just another example of how important he is to San Jose and why the team wants him back this summer before he can become a free agent.

"Basically his knee is floating there," coach Peter DeBoer said. "It was as courageous an effort, him doing what he did, as I've ever seen. And I didn't see a drop off in his game. I know the point production wasn't there. I think there's some answers for that, including power play and fatigue and some things like that. Until his level drops where he has to take a reduced role, that's not even on my radar."

The futures of Thornton and teammate Patrick Marleau are the biggest questions for San Jose headed into the offseason. The two have been the face of the Sharks for years, with Marleau joining as the second-overall draft pick in 1997 and Thornton coming in a trade from Boston in 2005.

"I want to come back," Thornton said. "I think this is a Stanley Cup-caliber team and I think I'm a little bit older and I realize how good this team is. Of course, I'd like to come back. But we'll have to see. I'm sure we'll be talking."

They have been two of the league's most prolific players during their tenure, with Marleau scoring his 500th career goal this season and Thornton recording his 1,000th assist.

Thornton's production fell a bit this season. His 50 points were his fewest in a non-lockout season since he was a teenager in Boston in 1998-99. Thornton was also a key part of a power play that was ranked 25th in the regular season after years of being at the top of the league.

Marleau scored 27 goals this season and played a stronger overall game as evidenced by his improving plus-minus from negative 22 to four.

Both players will turn 38 before the start of next season, raising questions about how long San Jose will want to commit to them.

"Guys like that aren't growing on trees," defenseman Brent Burns said. "Both those guys, you hear about the age stuff, those guys are both in great shape. Every day they put the work in. They're elite players. Age doesn't matter."

Wilson called both players cornerstones of the franchise on and off the ice and seemed interested in them coming back. Both players also publicly expressed the same desire but the sides must come to terms on length and value.

There have been no talks yet between the parties and it is extremely unlikely any deal would be finalized before the expansion draft in June.

The other key questions for the Sharks headed into the offseason are who they will protect in the expansion draft and will they be able to reach long-term extensions with goalie Martin Jones and shut-down defenseman Marc-Edouard Vlasic.

Both players are eligible for free agency in 2018 but can sign extensions after July 1. Wilson said he would like to get those deals done before training camp.

"Both of them are extremely important to get under contract," Wilson said. "Those are priorities."